Skip to content
The Hungarians of Besh o DroM, straddling pop-rock and Balkan music

Article reserved for subscribers

Pettik Adam and Lili Kaszai, from the Besh o DroM group, on 9 August, at Sziget Festival, Budapest. PUSKAS DANIEL

If he is a band who knows Sziget well, it's Besh o DroM. The octet, whose name in Romani lovari means "ride the road", celebrates its twenty years of happy activity this year after giving the second concert of its existence in this festival that hosted another musician able to marry the traditions with a punk energy, Rachid Taha. Since then, the group formed in Budapest has experienced many changes of staff but its two founding leaders are still there, the singer and derbouka player Adam Pettik and his competitor Gergely Barcza, virtuoso of kaval, played flute historically in the Balkan countries, that he marries an EWI (Electronic Wind Instrument), a wind instrument connected to a computer. This association shows that Besh o DroM is a follower of the big gap between the folkloric heritage, from the Danube to the Nile, and modernity, at the risk of mistrusting the purists.

After a klezmer intro, the bodies never stopped hopping in front of the clarinet and the saxophone in fusion, leaning against an electric rhythmic section.

"Since 1999, we have played every year in Sziget, with one exception, and twice for several years," says Gergely Barcza, who remembers that on his first visit, he had struggled to find the only scene and was sound-oriented, on a dipped island. e in the dark. It is surrounded by garlands of lanterns that Besh o droM found its Hungarian fans on Friday, August 9th. After a klezmer intro, the bodies never stopped hopping in front of the clarinet and the saxophone in fusion, leaning against an electric rhythmic section suddenly rocking from polka to ska, from rockabilly to dâ € ™ à ¢ â,¬â € ™ infernal sixteenth notes that have nothing to envy to speed metal.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also In Hungary, the Sziget Music Festival, island of peaceful coexistence

But the soul remains Balkan: "Whether I go to Budapest or Bucharest, I'm struck by the cultural similarity, and so do Bulgaria or Macedonia, says Gergely Barcza. The cymbalum (held by Jozsef Csurkulya, the third member present since the beginning) or my kaval, for example, are instruments common to Hungarians and Romanians, " two peoples that nationalism has always sought to divide.

Exiled "because of Orban's policy"

In the 2000s, Besh o DroM took advantage, particularly in France, of a still vivid interest in gypsy music, after the success of the films Time of the Gypsies (Emir Kusturica, 1988) and Latcho Drom (Tony Gatlif, 1993). The vogue has fallen, without making the musicians of their route disappointing as they prepare their sixth album, the first since 2011.

Comments

Registration complete !

Show

Reset your password

Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Check your e-mail for the confirmation link.

Close